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Thread: 80s bikes parts and maintenance

  1. #1
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    Default 80s bikes parts and maintenance

    Hey guys, new biker here with a few questions for the experienced guys here regarding buying older motorcycles.
    I've been looking around at some of the offerings on Autotrader and the like, and every once in a while I see an old 1980-84 Suzuki GS850G or something similar for what seems to be reasonable prices. I really like the styling and it seems like a good deal.

    But is it though? Would an old bike like that be more trouble than it's worth? Would I be able to find someone to service it(I'm not skilled up enough yet, myself)? Would they have trouble finding parts? Would that R30K bike just end up costing me R200K and months of headache?
    Last edited by RikRik; 03-07-2019 at 07:08 AM. Reason: typos

  2. #2
    Dirty Bella
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    Ironman will always ride a GS1000G in my mind. Even though he sold it and rides a scooter now. On his tool cabinet it says Andre GS1000E even to this day. A really amazing bike. Power and fun practical bike. I just wish they knew about brakes in the 80s. Ironman sold his cause he is a perfectionist. And parts take time and are hard to find. And the little rubber mounts and things need changing after the rough 40 years they been around. Really beautiful bikes though. Man. I do miss that beautiful bike

    Ironman and me going for a ride back in the day.


    Ironman being the perfectionist he is only rides the perfect bikes in their best condition


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  3. #3
    Hooligan Biker
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    Like most classics, we don't buy because one can easily replace the plastics by ordering them on AliExpress. Passion is what drives it.
    • Yes, the R30k gem CAN cost a bit more in the short term, especially if you relying upon a workshop to do the maintenance for you.
    • Yes, some parts are harder to come by, so you may be importing more regularly than you'd anticipated. That's not to say it'll be more expensive than procuring locally.
    • Be prepared to put in the elbow grease.
    • If you the type of consumer that pays for a "service", then ensure pockets are deep if you buy a classic.
    • If you prepared to do as much work, buy the tools, and troll forums for answers, then I'd say identify a gem. Acquire the gem. Enjoy every moment of it.

    Quote Originally Posted by RikRik View Post
    Would an old bike like that be more trouble than it's worth? Would I be able to find someone to service it(I'm not skilled up enough yet, myself)? Would they have trouble finding parts? Would that R30K bike just end up costing me R200K and months of headache?


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  4. #4
    Nuon Fangirl

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ntjamme View Post
    Like most classics, we don't buy because one can easily replace the plastics by ordering them on AliExpress. Passion is what drives it.
    • Yes, the R30k gem CAN cost a bit more in the short term, especially if you relying upon a workshop to do the maintenance for you.
    • Yes, some parts are harder to come by, so you may be importing more regularly than you'd anticipated. That's not to say it'll be more expensive than procuring locally.
    • Be prepared to put in the elbow grease.
    • If you the type of consumer that pays for a "service", then ensure pockets are deep if you buy a classic.
    • If you prepared to do as much work, buy the tools, and troll forums for answers, then I'd say identify a gem. Acquire the gem. Enjoy every moment of it.





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    Ntjamme makes a lot of sense. If you will require a workshop to supply parts and labour, avoid a bike like this. If you can do work yourself, source parts yourself, or even McGyver parts, you can consider.

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