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Thread: Lightning's Electric Superbike takes 2013 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb

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    Sarel van der Merwe Hover Ho''s Avatar
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    Default Lightning's Electric Superbike takes 2013 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb

    http://www.gizmag.com/lightning-elec...es-peak/28296/


    Carlin Dunne takes his Lightning Electric Superbike up Pikes Peak (Photo: Lightning Motorcycle Corp.)

    Image Gallery (7 images)


    Innovation through competition. That is the corporate motto of Lightning Motorcycle Corp., the designers and manufacturers of the Electric Superbike. A production version of the Electric Superbike has won this year's Pikes Peak International Hill Climb among two wheelers (both gas and electric) with a time of 10 minutes and 0.964 seconds. The nearest competitor, racing a Ducati Multistrada, finished with a time nearly 20 seconds slower.



    The Lightning Motorcycle Electric Superbike seems to collect records as easily as falling off a log. It holds the current world records for fastest production motorcycle (189.086 mph / 304.304 km/h), and in a tweaked version for fastest electric motorcycle (215.960 mph / 374.554 km/h). While setting this latter record, the equivalent fuel mileage was still better than 50 mpg. Now it also holds the record for fastest ascent of Pikes Peak by an electric motorcycle. More importantly, it is the first electric motorcycle to win over a field of gas-powered motorcycles.

    Carlin Dunne, who rode the Superbike to two-wheel victory at Pikes Peak this year, is no stranger to records himself. He has now won the Pikes Peak climb three years in a row, and owns the all-time record of nine minutes and 52.819 seconds for his performance in 2012 on a Ducati Multistrada 1200.



    Of course, the Pikes Peak Climb is ideally suited to electric bikes. It takes place at altitudes that make regular gasoline engines cough and wheeze. But as the twists and turns of the course are a bit more difficult on a bike with a battery pack weighing about 250 pounds (110 kg), what the Superbike wins in the straights might be lost in the roundabouts. But not this year.

    The Electric Superbike boasts an amazing set of specs. The motor is an internal permanent magnet Remy HVH250, an oil-cooled electric topping out at 10,000 rpm that pumps out in excess of 125 hp (92 kW). The exact value isn't specified, and the HVH250 can put out 230 hp (170 kW) at higher voltage than used in the Superbike. The basic Superbike comes with a lithium-ion battery pack that holds 12 kWh of energy at 370 volts, but a larger pack can be chosen. The total weight of the bike is just under 500 pounds.
    Lightning claims 0 - 100 mph (160 km/h) time of 3 seconds, and acceleration from 100 mph to top speed (166 mph for the basic Superbike) in less than ten seconds.


    The Superbike uses a monocoque design by Glenn Kerr, wherein the battery pack and motor serve a dual function as the primary stressed elements of the chassis, a design whose equivalent appears in most large gas-powered bikes. The swingarm of the Superbike is directly connected to the rear of the motor.

    Lightning's Superbike is equipped with user-programmable regenerative braking, allowing the batteries to be charged whenever the throttle is closed and the brakes applied. The effect on the ride is said to closely replicate the engine braking effect characteristic of gas-powered bikes. The programming allows the user to balance the braking between maximum range and driving style.
    As for range, Lightning says that if the rider can expect a range over 100 miles (160 km) on the highway, and perhaps 150 miles (240 km) in mixed driving. So even with recharge times of under two hours, the bike cannot be confused with a touring bike.
    A basic version of the Superbike can now be purchased for US$38,888. Lightning has not given details on the available options, but control electronics that provide larger voltages to the motor would be of particular interest, as would a gear ratio (the enormous torque of an electric motor makes shifting unnecessary) more similar to the record-winning prototypes.
    The Lightning Electric Superbike could provide a practical proposition for would-be weekend warriors. The bike can be driven as a commuter during the week, for which it has sufficient range and recharge times. On the weekends, it is one of the fastest bikes available for short races. The market may be limited, but most riders will not be able to safely wring the top performance out of a Superbike. Still, many would like to try.
    Check out the video below for scenes from the Pikes Peak climb.
    Sources: Pikes Peak International Hill Climb and Lightning Motorcycle
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EoO9...layer_embedded
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    Biker Trash Gelmir's Avatar
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    Such a nice looking bike, but somehow I just don't see riders ditching their 14,000rpm screamers for one of these.
    Sure it's quick, but does it SOUND as good?

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    No point to it if it sounds like a Scalexctric/Ninco ..?
    Suddenly terror struck...he`s never seen a naked woman before...

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    2xPolar
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    The electric bikes are great, but the only drawback has always been that it takes me 5 minutes to refuel my current bike after doing 400km and until electrics can achieve this or better, they will not become mainstream.

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    Nuon Fangirl

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    Biggest issue with the Isle of Man TT Zero is that th ebikes do not scare birds and small animals from the track. This goes lik ethe clappers, but the IoM TT Zero class impressed this year as they broke the 160km/h average speed over 4 laps.

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    Did you guys see the video of the Lightning at Pikes Peak?
    They added a beeper to it. The bikes is pretty damn quiet with the normal electric whine as it reaches for high rpm.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2xPolar View Post
    The electric bikes are great, but the only drawback has always been that it takes me 5 minutes to refuel my current bike after doing 400km and until electrics can achieve this or better, they will not become mainstream.
    The thing is, how often do you go 400km?
    The majority of my trips is under 100km.

    What mileage is really mainstream?

    Electrics also have very few parts to maintain, so might just make excellent delivery bikes...
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2xPolar View Post
    The electric bikes are great, but the only drawback has always been that it takes me 5 minutes to refuel my current bike after doing 400km and until electrics can achieve this or better, they will not become mainstream.
    I hope you can read this, it's a snip from PC World New Zealand. This might solve the charging time dilemma in the future.

    PC World NZ July 2013 P17.jpg

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    GoogleBoy Pyro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Booster View Post
    I hope you can read this, it's a snip from PC World New Zealand. This might solve the charging time dilemma in the future.

    PC World NZ July 2013 P17.jpg
    This story still grinds my bones. She surely did not discover supercaps, so what exactly did she do that was worth the $50k prize.
    And why don't they give more details on the Nav tech that won a bigger prize?

    But the problem then becomes charging this supercap. High end batteries can handle more power, but getting a charger capable of supplying it isn't exactly trivial either. And what about poor little Eskom? They're already a bit 'strained'.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pyro View Post
    This story still grinds my bones. She surely did not discover supercaps, so what exactly did she do that was worth the $50k prize.
    And why don't they give more details on the Nav tech that won a bigger prize?

    But the problem then becomes charging this supercap. High end batteries can handle more power, but getting a charger capable of supplying it isn't exactly trivial either. And what about poor little Eskom? They're already a bit 'strained'.
    Yeah sorry Pyro, I haven't had time to Google the details of this story yet, I just thought that a technology that charges batteries might be relevant.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Booster View Post
    Yeah sorry Pyro, I haven't had time to Google the details of this story yet, I just thought that a technology that charges batteries might be relevant.
    The basic property was discovered sometime around 2010.
    One way of doing it would involve mixing a few ingredients together, and then place it on an optical disc, and pop it into a dvd writer.
    When you connect up the final product you've got a flexible super-cap.

    From the sound of things, she just recreated the experiment. Neat, and it seems it makes for good headlines, but... yah... it grinds my bones.

    Graphene itself is has some damn impressive properties, that's for sure.

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  11. #11
    2xPolar
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    Interesting reading on the "fast recharge". Thanks guys!

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    This is awesome, been playing around with the idea of converting a motorcycle to an electric. Parts like controllers (suitable to the voltage I want to use) to make it into a commuter that can least hit 90 km/h with at least a 80 km range and a 4-8 hour recharge is far and few inbetween. Suitable motors (golf cart or electric forklift) isn't something cheap that's lying around in the good old RSA. Would still love the idea to have a two wheeled commuter that can plug into a wall to fuel up. This is the best guide I could find so far: http://www.instructables.com/id/Buil...IC-MOTORCYCLE/

    Here's one of the only South African ones I could find: http://evconvert.co.za/

    The only problem I have (other than cash) is that RSA has no definite laws really covering electric vehicles and it leaves a huge gray area that could technically mean that electric vehicles (converted) could technically be illegal on our roads, because to register it or relicense it with a new "engine" it needs an engine number which is as far as I know non existent on most motors used for "EV" converts
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    GoogleBoy Pyro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FranTheGimp View Post
    This is awesome, been playing around with the idea of converting a motorcycle to an electric. Parts like controllers (suitable to the voltage I want to use) to make it into a commuter that can least hit 90 km/h with at least a 80 km range and a 4-8 hour recharge is far and few inbetween. Suitable motors (golf cart or electric forklift) isn't something cheap that's lying around in the good old RSA. Would still love the idea to have a two wheeled commuter that can plug into a wall to fuel up. This is the best guide I could find so far: http://www.instructables.com/id/Buil...IC-MOTORCYCLE/

    Here's one of the only South African ones I could find: http://evconvert.co.za/

    The only problem I have (other than cash) is that RSA has no definite laws really covering electric vehicles and it leaves a huge gray area that could technically mean that electric vehicles (converted) could technically be illegal on our roads, because to register it or relicense it with a new "engine" it needs an engine number which is as far as I know non existent on most motors used for "EV" converts
    My thinking was to go almost hybrid, with an electic as extra power, but that would also mean you cannot strip the frame completely and complicates thing significantly. That would get around the legality though...

    But all my numbers bring me to something which is just not practical enough for me to accept.

    The batteries are just not there yet, although LiFePO4 is quite good.
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    Biker Trash DeTour's Avatar
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    At US$38,888 I think it will still be quite a while before they replace good old petrol engines!

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeTour View Post
    At US$38,888 I think it will still be quite a while before they replace good old petrol engines!
    No doubt. If it drops to $20,000 it might be more feasible.
    $15k for superbike pricing, and $5000 can be negated as a potential saving over time.
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