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Thread: Tips on Commuting by bike

  1. #161
    Hooligan Biker bluedevil678's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pietleeu View Post
    Found this article to be a great read..
    http://www.ourplace.co.za/Surviving%20Rush%20Hour.pdf

    Fantastic, thank you!
    --Stay Safe--
    --Stay Alive-
    -


  2. #162
    Evil Biker Scum tp007's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ares View Post
    I agree.

    However, I do split on single roads, as they are part of my route to work, and usualy have a huge congo line of cars....I try to keep it as safe as I can and merge back into the lane when on coming traffic approaches, or when the line starts to move.
    Quote Originally Posted by Buelligan View Post
    Experts = Ex, has been, is no more. Spurt = drip under pressure. Therefore I am not yet a has been drip, under pressure.....but as with all things pertaining to biking, use your brain first.
    I often split on single lane roads, when it is safe to do so. As Ares said, if you keep a watch for spaces where you can merge into it is not an issue. Also in most suburban areas I find that drivers get used to you and actually move over for you. Be nice and they usually are nice in return. You have to be alert and keep watching the traffic ahead of you, as we all should always be doing
    Agree. Also want to add that I don't pass where there is a side road where someone can decide to turn right. Even then I take it slow and watch out for a car that suddenly decides to do a u-turn.

    Me and a guy on a Black Versys past cars in a single lane the other day. I spotted a car with indicator on to turn right. I slowed down and showed the car he can move over to turn right. Mr. impatient decided to pass the car on the right. Luckily the driver of the car saw him just in time not to push him into oncoming traffic...

  3. #163
    Dr. Questionnaire Outcast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alptraumsong View Post
    Greetings mense, forum newb here.

    My bike tends to start losing power on uphills, so whenever I can I just let people pass me (preferably on the right). Bit me yesterday when I waved a woman in front then checked right to turn in and when I looked back in front she cut in front of me turning left.

    Panic> slam brakes before I hit her> cuddle with the pavement > ask some nice people for a dressing.

    Apparently she thought I was "further back".

    Wanted to confirm the etiquette for these situations. Might just be a mechanical otherwise might be doing this for a while. 180cc going through Linden and Rosebank and all the hills that entails. (Randpark Ridge to Melrose Arch commute.)

    Had the bike since May but only started riding for reals this week.

    BTW not lane splitting.
    I hear you. I had a 200cc Supermoto, and thought it would be great for town. But very weak engine. The most I got from it was 100 kms/h, which made me very uncomfortable. Especially with those fast busses and trucks from behind.

    I was just very lucky to be able upgrade to a bigger bike, which took me to a level where I could get out of those slow situations.
    1) Everyone smiles in the same language.

    2) Life is too short for traffic. ~Dan Bellack

  4. #164
    GoogleBoy Pyro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tp007 View Post
    Agree. Also want to add that I don't pass where there is a side road where someone can decide to turn right. Even then I take it slow and watch out for a car that suddenly decides to do a u-turn.

    Me and a guy on a Black Versys past cars in a single lane the other day. I spotted a car with indicator on to turn right. I slowed down and showed the car he can move over to turn right. Mr. impatient decided to pass the car on the right. Luckily the driver of the car saw him just in time not to push him into oncoming traffic...
    That has happened WAY too often on my commutes.
    Slow down or in some other way give way to other traffic, only to have an impatient dolt take a gap.

    Quite a few call came from this, so I'm way more wary if someone is following too closely.
    Four wheels move the Body; Two wheels move the Soul
    Fuelly: CBR600F Ninja 250R

  5. #165
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    My issue with splitting on single lane roads are the bikers splitting the other way.

    XD

  6. #166
    Little frunker. Ares's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alptraumsong View Post
    My issue with splitting on single lane roads are the bikers splitting the other way.
    I usualy see them well ahead of time (Unless its around a bend, in which case I a merge back anyway), and merge back to allow them past as soon as I can.

    Either that, or they merge. Either way, alot of merging is done to great effect thus far.
    Ricers are bikers too!

  7. #167
    N.O.B. CycleJunkie's Avatar
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    I have started videoing a lot of my trips (if I am wearing the helmet with the mounting) for Alexj. Keep your eyes peeled for posts. \the good and the bad. All comments will hopefully save lives and make splitting safer and more comfortable for other bikers.

    We all do things that we may not be aware of while riding that changing may make us safer. Reviewing my trips has been quite revealing... When I am impatient, angry, in a hurry, chilled, alert...

    Biggest thing I have seen, also in other recent threads, is that slowing down is just the best thing to do. The time savings by going 10 -20% faster are really minuscule yet the risks go up by considerably more. Especially as there seems to be a growing non-compliance with road laws.

    Be the change you want to see.
    Hoo Haa

  8. #168
    N00b
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    Thanks a million!

  9. #169
    LM the Brave PRAWN LawMongrel's Avatar
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    Taken from here: http://www.revzilla.com/common-tread...=boosted-posts

    I read a story recently on another moto site about this guy on a motorcycle who films himself riding real aggressively and smashing mirrors off cars when motorists commit traffic sins.
    Although this guy is living out my occasional "Falling Down" fantasy, I think he's a tool. I started reading the comments on the story. You can usually tell quickly who has only a car, and who has a motorcycle. I was disappointed by what I read. (The term “cager” got tossed around a lot.)
    Motorcyclists in the United States are enthusiasts. Automobile drivers might be, but most are not. Most Joe Average drivers feel no passion for their vehicles. It's an appliance, like a toaster. They’re just trying to pilot their minivan to work, the store or wherever. They don’t undergo any meaningful education on operating their vehicle, and continuing education is a pipe dream in this country. Hell, the driver was probably taught how to drive by his mom, who probably also was a poor driver.
    That’s probably a good part of the reason we see folks not using turn signals, not checking their mirrors, not yielding the right of way, and tapping away at a cell phone as they drive. Those infractions can be lethal to a motorcyclist. However, motorcyclists are the minority, like it or not.

    Masked bandit? Nah. This rider just doesn't want to swallow a bug. But to a motorist who's experienced the wrath of a frightened motorcyclist, this guy looks like bad news. Photo by Lemmy.Drivers often forget — or are unaware of the fact — that they are piloting what is in essence a two-ton missile. When they see a motorcyclist, many feel as though that person is a bit of a nutjob. They get skittish because they have no idea why that guy is riding the way he’s riding. Motorcycles are hard to see, and they move around so much! Automobile drivers are generally quite oblivious to the disparity in braking performance or power-to-weight ratio that a motorcycle has because they’ve never ridden a bike. So they plod along at 47 mph in the left lane, white-knuckling the wheel the whole time, terrified of moving and killing this mental case riding around on a motorcycle. When you think about things from the motorist’s point of view, we areinconvenient.
    Because of this, I try to be cognizant of three things.
    One: It's not "us vs. them"

    The first is that I’m a “cager,” too. I have a lot of motorcycles. I also have four-wheeled conveyances and most of the guys I ride with have a truck or a car. I think it’s rare (not impossible, but not the norm) in North America to have only a bike. It’s not an “us and them” situation. We’re all using the roadway. There are times I’m sitting in traffic in a truck, and some dude zooms by me splitting a lane. I’m always happy for him. Good job getting out of this mess, dude. It can be hair-raising, but I remember how much more nimble that guy on a bike is than I am.
    Sometimes just explaining that difference to “car-only” people can help them understand a bit better. It can also help them realize that you too drive a car and understand that viewpoint. (And not a “cage.” That term is probably not a great one to use to someone you’re trying to persuade to your point of view.) One of the other things that can be helpful is to point out that lane splitting is legal pretty much everywhere in the world except 49 of the United States.
    Two: Let it go, move on

    Another thing I try to remember is that when someone pulls some stupid traffic boner, the best thing I can do is survive, move on, and forget it, like the motorcycle messengers in this old story Lance wrote. Get away from the problem. I can always just pull over and drink some water or take a whiz in the woods or whatever. What’s the worst that happens? If it’s one of my days off, I get to camp 10 minutes later. Who cares? If it’s on the way to work, I get to work 10 minutes later. Again, who cares? As our readers have said, no driver ever repented his sins and vowed to improve his driving because someone on a motorcycle screamed obscenities at him or smacked his mirror. This whole riding thing is supposed to be fun. If it’s not fun, I don’t really want to do it.

    When a driver does something stupid, the best response is to survive and then move on and forget about it. Pull over and take a break, if necessary. Photo by Lance Oliver.Three: Whatever happens, it's my own fault

    The last thing I try to remember is probably the most controversial. I operate under the assumption that every accident is my fault. All of them.
    The drunk running the red light? My fault for not seeing him coming. The guy who centerpunches my rear end at a stop light? My fault for not watching my mirrors and having an escape route. Sure, legally and financially, someone else may be responsible, but it's my responsibility to make it home to my family. By kicking over some deathtrap motorcycle and riding around on it, I’m saying to my loved ones, “Yes, I know this is dangerous. I’m focused on this so intently, though, that I’m pretty sure I don’t need a protective steel cocoon wrapped around me. I can be exposed to the elements, and I still will come home alive to you.”
    Right or wrong doesn’t really matter in a motorcycle accident. Even if the accident is “their fault,” I’ve still made that decision to ride knowing something dangerous — even fatal — can happen. I don’t hang up my leathers, I just ride knowing that I need to work harder to get home safe.
    Maybe you agree with me, maybe you think I’m nuts. Ultimately, I can’t “fix” a bad driver. But I can pull over and see if the gas station has gummy bears. And on our roadways, sometimes that’s all the control I need.
    Beats punching mirrors, eh?

  10. #170

  11. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by Outcast View Post
    A guy that works with me, lost a friend like this 2 weeks ago. His friend decided to split, misjudged the oncoming traffic, and had a head on collision with a taxi. He died on the scene.

    Anywhere else I would probably try and do it (even though I don't like the fact that cars are coming your way), but in a place where taxi's drive like they do here...no thank you. On a related note, for the same reason, I wish bicycle drivers would also not drive on the wrong side of the road...

  12. #172
    Biker

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    Great post and thanks for the new ones I haven't seen/heard before.

  13. #173
    Hooligan Biker

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    Quote Originally Posted by Acajou View Post
    I have a question that's been bothering me for a while. Is it considered kosher to lane split on a single lane road? I've seen a few times here and there people say to never split over a solid white line. Considering most single lane roads in urban areas are solid white (no overtaking), should one not split then? I don't deal with traffic a lot, considering where I live, but sometimes rush hour traffic can be quite heavy and then I always split even though it's sometimes over a white line. I do make sure not to cross the solid line when there is moving traffic from the front.
    For me it depends on the overall conditions. Favourable weather conditions permitting, then it primarily depends on the speed of the traffic. If the traffic is crawling, I would lane-share past, but, as a rule, I don't split on single carriage ways if traffic goes 60+.

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